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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
military leaders talked about alternative energy production and the country's dependence on oil. speakers included gene sperling, director of the white house international council, and republican senators. hosted by securing america's future energy, this is about an hour-and-a-half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the energy security leadership council for being with us today. they have been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's, an entrepreneur, and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special>> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the
for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. its hard to believe, but weve been here before. first, negotiators pledge to work together then they test what the other side is willing to give. then they submit plans they know the other side will reject. and then, only then, a deal is struck. maybe, but not yet. and with every day that passes, congress and the white house edge close to raising taxes, cutting spending and sending the nation back into recession. here are the arguments -- >> the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about, for example, $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he will do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math,
. -- it was in the 1990's. because we are more competitive on energy prices and people are saying we will be relatively competitively on the energy price component and construction and cost, i think there is reasonable evidence we are starting to pull in more manufacturing. we may have hit the bottom the started in 1979. there is a reason for hope. i think the metaphor is the automobile out. there might even be more policy there. i cannot imagine if there is an aggressive policy on manufacturing and construction -- that is another word for infrastructure, and there might be some hope, especially for less skilled mails. >> i am glad anthony mentioned energy cost. we have done even mention climate change, which i think is going to be -- it all way -- already is a major issue for the world to face. it will only grow in importance and significance. looking at the development boom and the potential for shell gas and shale oil is a real opportunity and challenge. an opportunity for significant economic growth, an opportunity to move away from dirtier fossil fuels and maybe served as a bridge into renewable e
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)